Broccoli is known to be a hearty and tasty vegetable which is rich in dozens of nutrients. It is said to pack the most nutritional punch of any vegetable.Broccoli shares cancer fighting and immune boosting properties with other cruciferous vegetables such as cauliflower, Brussels sprouts and cabbage. Broccoli contains properties that depletes estrogens which usually cause cancer in the body. Research shows that broccoli is extremely suitable for preventing breast and uterus cancer. 

Ingredients:

1 cup broccoli florets
3 tbsp butter
1/4 cup chopped onions
2 tbsp plain flour (maida)
2 cups milk
2 tbsp fresh cream
salt and freshly ground black pepper (kalimirch) to taste
a pinch of nutmeg (jaiphal) powder
  Method:
  1. Heat 1 tbsp of butter in a deep non-stick pan, add the onions and saute on a medium flame for 1 minute.
  2. Add the broccoli and saute on a medium flame for 2 minutes.
  3. Add 1½ cups of water, mix well and cook on a medium flame for 4 minutes or till the broccoli is cooked. Remove and keep aside to cool.
  4. Transfer to a mixer and blend into a smooth puree. Keep aside.
  5. Heat the remaining 2 tbsp of butter in another deep non-stick pan, add the flour and saute using a whisk on a medium flame for 30 seconds taking care that the flour does not discolour.
  6. Add the milk and cook on a medium flame for 5 minutes, while stirring continuously with a whisk.
  7. Add the broccoli puree, salt, pepper and nutmeg powder, mix well and simmer on a medium flame for another 3 to 4 minutes.
  8. Switch off the flame, add the fresh cream and mix well.
  9. Serve hot.

Tip: (for 5 & 6 Step)

As soon as the flour has lost its raw smell, start pouring in the milk in small additions, whisking the whole time. Adding in small increments is key. It allows you to ensure that the flour isn't sitting in clumps at the bottom of the pan, which can lead to a grainy or lumpy sauce later on. If you've got good coordination and a nice heavy pan, you can slowly drizzle with one hand while whisking with the other. Otherwise, you can splash in a couple of tablespoons at a time, working quickly and whisking in each addition before adding more.

At first, the roux will seize up into thick balls, but it will smooth out and become liquid again as more milk is added. Once all the milk has been added, it'll usually seem as thin as plain milk. That's fine; just bring it to a simmer, and the flour will start to do its thing, its starch swelling and bursting and thickening the sauce.

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